HOLY RESURRECTION ORTHODOX CATHEDRAL
(Orthodox Church in America)
591 North Main Street Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania
WELCOME TO OUR CHURCH COMMUNITY!

HOLY RESURRECTION ORTHODOX CATHEDRAL is a parish community of the Diocese of Philadelphia & Eastern Pennsylvania of the Orthodox Church in America (OCA). Our bishop, Archbishop MARK (Maymon), provides spiritual oversight for our community. The parish community was founded in 1892 by Fr. Alexis Toth (now a canonized saint in the Orthodox Church).

UPCOMING EVENTS...

Holy Resurrection Cathedral located at 591 N. Main St., Wilkes Barre, PA, will be hosting Dr. David Ford on Tuesday Feb. 25th at 6:30p.m. The presentation is called: "Gems of Wisdom from St. John Chrysostom, in Brand-New Translation." Following the presentation there will be time for Q & A and refreshments will be served. All are welcome to attend!  

                                                              Diocese of Philadelphia & Eastern Pennsylvania

                                                                  BI-ANNUAL WOMEN’S RETREAT

                                                                   “Preparing our Hearts for Great Lent”

RETREAT PRESENTER Mother Gabriella Dormition of the Mother of God Monastery SATURDAY, February 22, 2020, 9:30am - 3:00pm (Divine Liturgy – 8 AM) St. Tikhon’s Monastery Trapeza Cost: $10/person (includes continental breakfast and lunch) Deadline to mail in form - February 17, 2020

                                                             WOMEN’S RETREAT REGISTRATION FORM *******************************************************************************

Name

Address

Phone Number

Parish Email Address (optional)

Please return the registration form by February 17, 2020 to:

Diocese of Philadelphia & Eastern, PA    

Department of Curriculum & Education    

325 North Walnut Street      

Bath, PA 18014

If you have any questions, please call (910) 988-3462 or email Matushka Emilia Shepherd at officermillie79@gmail.com

Please make checks payable to: Diocese of Eastern PA Annotate in the Memo line for Women’s Retreat

 

Follow the Diocese on Instagram: Follow us @oca_doepa or OCA Diocese of Eastern PA

WORSHIP, PRAYER and SERVICE SCHEDULE
Regular Weekly Services (Unless otherwise noted)

Saturday-  Great Vespers 4:00 pm 

Sunday-    Prayer of the Hours 8:40 am  &  Divine Liturgy 9:00 am 

Eve of Major Feast Days - Great Vespers 6:00 pm (followed by holy Confession)

Major Feast Days -  Divine Liturgy 9:00 am

 

Rector: Fr. Gregory G. White Sr. 570-822-7725 gregory.white@stots.edu

Mitred Archpriest Vladimir Petorak: Pastor Emeritus

Protodeacon: Sergei Kapral

Mr. John Hawranick Jr.: Choir Director, 570-900-1699 jhawranick@yahoo.com 

Mr. Michael Pieck: Board of Directors President

Catechism Classes - For those who are interested in joining the Orthodox Church instruction classes are offered on a continual / rotating basis. For more information contact Fr. Gregory at 570-822-7725 or email him at:  gregory.white@stots.edu

 

Study Group & Recommended Reading

Orthodox study group currently reading: Matthew The Poor, Orthodox Prayer Life, The Interior Way, by Father Matta El-Meskeen, St. Valdimirs Press, ISBN 978-0-88141-250-5. Tuesday nights @ 6:30 p.m. at Holy Resurrection Orthodox Cathedral 591 N. Main St. Wilkes-Barre, PA. Bring your Orthodox Study Bible! First time visitors should call ahead of time to confirm the weekly schedule.  Many of the following books are rated four to five stars. They are recommended reading for those who want to know more about the Holy Orthodox Faith and the early Church!

Thirsting for God in a Land of Shallow Wells by Matthew Gallatin, St. Valdimir's Seminary Press, ISBN 978-1-888212-28

https://www.svspress.com/

The Truth, What Every Roman Catholic Should Know About the Orthodox Church by Clark Carlton, Regina, Salisbury, MA

The Faith, Understanding Orthodox Christianity, An Orthodox Catechism also by Clark Carlton 

The Way, What Every Protestant Should Know About the Orthodox Faith also by Clark Carlton

Knowledge of God by Dr. Harry Boolas, St. Tikhon's Seminary Press ISBN 978-1-878997-83-8

Members of the Holy Orthodox Faith, or the more advanced inquirer are encouraged to also check out the following titles. They will help with your understanding of who Jesus Christ is.... What happened to the early Church?  Does it still exist?  What's Orthodox Salvation all about? 

Matthew The Poor, Orthodox Prayer Life, The Interior Way, by Father Matta El-Meskeen, St. Valdimirs Press, ISBN 978-0-88141-250-5

The Soul's Longing An Orthodox Christian Perspective on Biblical Interpretation by Dr. Mary Ford ISBN 978-0-9905029-6-8 

A must read for those that struggle with Biblical Interpretation in this day and age of Denominationalism. Read how the early Church understood the Holy Scripture and it's Tradition. 

The Orthodox Study Bible by Thomas Nelson Publishing. Full of comemtary, teachings, references and study articles ISBN 978-0-7180-0359-3 

Orthodox Spirituality by Metropolitan Nafpaktos Hierotheos, Birth of the Theotokos Monastery ISBN 978-960-7070-20-3 

Passions and Virtues According to St. Gregory Palamas by Anestis Keselopoulos, St. Tikhon's Seminary Press,                     ISBN 1-878997-75-0  

Acquiring the Mind of Christ by Archimandrite Serguis, St. Tikhon's Monastery Press, ISBN 978-0-995029-9-9 

https://sttikhonsmonastery.org/

Glory and Honor, Orthodox Christian Resources on Marriage by Dr. David Ford, Dr. Mary Ford and Alfred Kentigern Siewers. Editors, St. Valdimirs Seminary Press, ISBN 9789-0-8841-540-1. A must read before you get married! 

Angels and Demons by Dr. Harry Boosalis, ISBN 978-1-878997-83-8 

Holy Traditon by Dr. Harry Boosalis, ISBN 978-0-9884574-2-3 

Orthodox Spiritual Life According to Saint Silouan the Anthonite by Dr. Harry Boosalas, St. Tikhon's Seminary Press, ISBN 978-1-878997-60-9

https://www.stspress.com/

Man the Target of God by Archimandrite Zacharias, Mount Tabor Publishing 

The following series of titles expand even more on Wisdom and Spirituality inspired by the Holy Spirit by the Monastic life on Mount Athos. The three stages of Orthodox Christian Salvation; Purification, Illumination and Deification are outlined throughout these timeless resources.  

Remember Thy First Love by Archimandrite Zacharias, Mount Tabor Publishing 

Enlargement of the Heart by Archimandrite Zacharias, Mount Tabor Publishing 

The Hidden Man of the Heart by Archimandrite Zacharias, Mount Tabor Publishing  

Saint Silouan the Anthonite by Archimandrite Sophrony, Mount Tabor Publishing  

http://mountthabor.com/

Information on Mount Athos

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Athos

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6mXl8C4-M_4&t=15s

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5D8OxrSZZU8&t=361s

 

 

 

ABOUT THE UPCOMING FEAST...

Sunday of Meatfare of the Last Judgment

Today’s Gospel reading is Matthew 25:31-46, the parable of the Last Judgment. It reminds us that while trusting in Christ’s love and mercy, we must not forget His righteous judgment when He comes again in glory. If our hearts remain hardened and unrepentant, we should not expect the Lord to overlook our transgressions simply because He is a good and loving God. Although He does not desire the death of a sinner, He also expects us to turn from our wickedness and live (Ezek. 33:11). This same idea is expressed in the prayer read by the priest after the penitent has confessed his or her sins (Slavic practice).

The time for repentance and forgiveness is now, in the present life. At the Second Coming, Christ will appear as the righteous Judge, “Who will render to every man according to his deeds” (Rom. 2:6). Then the time for entreating God’s mercy and forgiveness will have passed.

As Father Alexander Schmemann reminds us in his book GREAT LENT (Ch. 1:4), sin is the absence of love, it is separation and isolation. When Christ comes to judge the world, His criterion for judgment will be love. Christian love entails seeing Christ in other people, our family, our friends, and everyone else we may encounter in our lives. We shall be judged on whether we have loved, or not loved, our neighbor. We show Christian love when we feed the hungry, give drink to the thirsty, clothe the naked, visit those who are sick or in prison. If we did such things for the least of Christ’s brethren, then we also did them for Christ (Mt.25:40). If we did not do such things for the least of the brethren, neither did we do them for Christ (Mt.25:45).

Today is the last day for eating meat and meat products until Pascha, though eggs and dairy products are permitted every day during the coming week. This limited fasting prepares us gradually for the more intense fasting of Great Lent.

Sunday of the Prodigal Son

The Sunday after the Sunday of the Publican and the Pharisee is the Sunday of the Prodigal Son. This parable of God’s forgiveness calls us to “come to ourselves” as did the prodigal son, to see ourselves as being “in a far country” far from the Father’s house, and to make the journey of return to God. We are given every assurance by the Master that our heavenly Father will receive us with joy and gladness. We must only “arise and go,” confessing our self-inflicted and sinful separation from that “home” where we truly belong (Luke 15:11-24).

After the Polyeleion at Matins, we first hear the lenten hymn “By the Waters of Babylon.” It will be sung for the next two Sundays before Lent begins, and it serves to reinforce the theme of exile in today’s Gosp

Sunday of the Publican and the Pharisee Beginning of the Lenten Triodion

The Sunday after the Sunday of Zacchaeus is devoted to the Publican and the Pharisee. At Vespers the night before, the TRIODION (the liturgical book used in the services of Great Lent) begins.

Two men went to the Temple to pray. One was a Pharisee who scrupulously observed the requirements of religion: he prayed, fasted, and contributed money to the Temple. These are very good things, and should be imitated by anyone who loves God. We who may not fulfill these requirements as well as the Pharisee did should not feel entitled to criticize him for being faithful. His sin was in looking down on the Publican and feeling justified because of his external religious observances.

The second man was a Publican, a tax-collector who was despised by the people. He, however, displayed humility, and this humility justified him before God (Luke 18:14).

The lesson to be learned is that we possess neither the Pharisee’s religious piety, nor the Publican’s repentance, through which we can be saved. We are called to see ourselves as we really are in the light of Christ’s teaching, asking Him to be merciful to us, deliver us from sin, and to lead us on the path of salvation.

Sunday of Zacchaeus

The paschal season of the Church is preceded by the season of Great Lent, which is also preceded by its own liturgical preparation. The first sign of the approach of Great Lent comes five Sundays before its beginning. On this Sunday the Gospel reading is about Zacchaeus the tax-collector. It tells how Christ brought salvation to the sinful man, and how his life was changed simply because he “sought to see who Jesus was” (Luke 19:3). The desire and effort to see Jesus begins the entire movement through Lent towards Pascha. It is the first movement of salvation.

Our lenten journey begins with a recognition of our own sinfulness, just as Zacchaeus recognized his. He promised to make restitution by giving half of his wealth to the poor, and by paying to those he had falsely accused four times as much as they had lost. In this, he went beyond the requirements of the Law (Ex. 22:3-12).

The example of Zacchaeus teaches us that we should turn away from our sins, and atone for them. The real proof of our sorrow and repentance is not just a verbal apology, but when we correct ourselves and try to make amends for the consequences of our evil actions.

We are also assured of God’s mercy and compassion by Christ’s words to Zacchaeus, “Today salvation is come to this house” (Luke 19:9). After the Great Doxology at Sunday Matins (when the Tone of the week is Tone 1, 3, 5, 7) we sing the Dismissal Hymn of the Resurrection “Today salvation has come to the world,” which echoes the Lord’s words to Zacchaeus.

Zacchaeus was short, so he climbed a tree in order to see the Lord. All of us have sinned and come short of the glory of God (Rom. 3:23). We are also short in our spiritual stature, therefore we must climb the ladder of the virtues. In other words, we must prepare for spiritual effort and growth.

St Zacchaeus is also commemorated on April 20.

 

Upcoming

29

Feb

Saturday

4:00 Great Vespers
Fast: dairy, fish, wine, & oil

1

Mar

Sunday

Cheesefare Sunday 
8:40 Prayer of the Hours
9:00 am Divine Liturgy
Followed by Forgiveness Vespers 
Fast: dairy, fish, wine, & oil

2

Mar

Monday

6:00p.m. Beginning of Great Canon 
Fast

Ancient Faith Radio

The Mission of The Orthodox Church in America, the local autocephalous Orthodox Christian Church, is to be faithful in fulfilling the commandment of Christ to “Go into all the world and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit…”

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Holy Resurrection Cathedral is part of the Diocese of Eastern Pennsylvania, which is presided over by The Most Reverend Mark (Maymon), Archbishop of Philadelphia and Eastern Pennsylvania. Our mission is bringing the joy of Christ's resurrection to those who have never heard the Good News, and to strengthen and encourage the faithful who reside within Wilkes-Barre and the local area. 

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The Holy Scripture is a collection of books written over multiple centuries by those inspired by God to do so. It is the primary witness to the Orthodox Christian faith, within Holy Tradition and often described as its highest point. It was written by the prophets and apostles in human language, inspired by the Holy Spirit, and collected, edited, and canonized by the Church.

Daily Readings >

Holiness or sainthood is a gift (charisma) given by God to man, through the Holy Spirit. Man's effort to become a participant in the life of divine holiness is indispensable, but sanctification itself is the work of the Holy Trinity, especially through the sanctifying power of Jesus Christ, who was incarnate, suffered crucifixion, and rose from the dead, in order to lead us to the life of holiness, through the communion with the Holy Spirit.

Today's Saints >

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